48 Propane Tank Sizes: Dimensions, Weight, BTUs (1lb To 2,000 Gallons)


When calculating heating outputs, we needed all the different propane tank sizes to adequately size heating units. This would range anywhere from figuring out:

  • Propane tank dimensions (length, diameter, height, width).
  • Propane tank weight.
  • Actually propane content and BTU content of that propane in a tank: ie: ‘How many BTUs in a 20 lb to 100 gallon propane tank?’

Here’s an example of what we wanted:

250 gallon residential propane tank is 7 feet 8 inches long, with a diameter of 30 inches. It can hold a maximum of 200 gallons (80% rule) Empty weight: 483 pounds. Full weight: 1,333 pounds. Full BTU content is 18,300,000 BTUs; that’s enough to provide 10,000 BTU/h for 76 days And 6 hours.

propane tank sizes for homes
Lengths of residential propane tanks (250 gallon, 500 gallon, and 1,000 gallon units).

Finding all these propane tank specs wasn’t easy at all. Even finding the dimensions of the most common 20 lb, 100 lb, 250 gallons, and 500-gallon propane tanks was difficult. If you have Googled a bit about propane tank sizes, you probably had a similar experience.

We haven’t found a website resource that would like to list all the propane cylinders – from 1 lb propane bottle to the huge underground 2,000 gallon propane tank – with their sizes; primarily dimensions and tare weight (empty weight).

To help out everybody looking for propane tank dimensions and ‘how much does X lb or gallon propane tank weight empty?’, we decided to create a full propane tank sizes chart (you can check it below).

It contains all 48 standardized propane tank sizes. The chart covers every propane tank from the smallest 1 lb tank to the biggest 2,000-gallon propane tank. Here is how you categorize them a bit:

  • Propane Bottle Sizes: That’s just 1, 2, and 3 lb propane cylinders.
  • Small Propane Tank Sizes: 5-20 lb and 1-5 gallon propane tanks.
  • Standard Propane Tank Sizes: 25-420 lb and 6-80 gallon propane cylinder.
  • Residential Propane Tank Sizes: 100-2,000 gallon horizontal propane tanks. These are the propane tank sizes for home.

You will find a full chart covering all 48 propane tank sizes with average dimensions and tare weights further on.

propane tank sizes and dimensions
A range of vertical propane tanks from 5 lb to 100 lb.

Another very insightful note:

Below the chart, we also covered the 5 most common propane sizes (20 lb and 100 lb standard tanks, and 100 gallon, 250 gallon, and 500 gallon residential propane tanks). On top of specifying the dimensions and empty weight, we have added:

  • Full weight. Here we need to use propane gallon to lb conversion (1 gallon = 4.25 lb of propane).
  • Actual Propane Content. Should be only 80% of the total. Example: 100 gallon tank contains 80 gallons of propane. This is for safety reasons; higher temperatures expand the propane and a full 100% could create a too-high to handle pressure on the propane tank.
  • BTU Content. To figure out how long will a residential propane tank last, for example, you need the BTU content of propane. Here we need to use the propane gallon to BTU conversion (1 gallon = 91,500 BTU).
  • How Long Will Propane Last? Based on the total BTU content of propane, we calculated how many days and hours will a propane tank last given the 10,000 BTU/h continuous output.

Here’s an example for a 100 gallon residential propane tank:

Dimensions (LxWxH): 50x28x28 Inches
Propane Content: 80 Gallons
Empty Tank Weight: 212 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 552 Pounds
How Many BTUs: 7,320,000 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 30 Days And 12 Hours

You can find the best propane tank sizes, with weight, BTUs, and so on, below the chart.

Propane Tank Size Chart (All 48 Standardized Propane Tanks)

This chart covers the sizes and dimensions of propane tanks starting with the smallest (1 lb) and progressing to the largest propane tank (2,000 gallon):

Propane Tank Size: Length (Inches): Diameter (Inches): Width (Inches): Height (Inches): Empty Weight:
1 lb 8 inches 4 inches 4 inches 4 inches 1.3 pounds
2 lb 10 inches 5 inches 5 inches 5 inches 2.1 pounds
3 lb 10 inches 7 inches 7 inches 7 inches 3.7 pounds
1 gallon 12 inches 7.6 inches 7.6 inches 7.6 inches 5.9 pounds
5 lb 12 inches 8 inches 8 inches 8 inches 6.7 pounds
2 gallon 18 inches 8.8 inches 8.8 inches 8.8 inches 7.8 pounds
10 lb 18 inches 9 inches 9 inches 9 inches 9.8 pounds
11 lb 12.4 inches 12.2 inches 12.2 inches 12.2 inches 10.4 pounds
3 gallon 13 inches 12.2 inches 12.2 inches 12.2 inches 10.9 pounds
15 lb 18 inches 10 inches 10 inches 10 inches 11.8 pounds
4 gallon 18 inches 11.6 inches 11.6 inches 11.6 inches 12.7 pounds
20 lb 18 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 13.5 pound
5 gallon 20 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches  14.8 pounds
25 lb 21 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 15.1 pounds
6 gallon 24 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 17.2 pounds
7 gallon 24 inches 12.4 inches 12.4 inches 12.4 inches 18.9 pounds
30 lb 24 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 19.2 pounds
33 lb 26.75 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 23.3 pounds
40 lb 27 inches 14.5 inches 14.5 inches 14.5 inches 27.4 pounds
10 gallon 27 inches 15.1 inches 15.1 inches 15.1 inches 31.8 pounds
50 lb 27.4 inches 15.1 inches 15.1 inches 15.1 inches 34.1 pounds
60 lb 44.1 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 37.3 pounds
15 gallon 44.7 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 39.7 pounds
80 lb 46 inches 12 inches 12 inches 12 inches 43.2 pounds
20 gallon 46 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 12.5 inches 50.1 pounds
100 lb 48 inches 14.5 inches 14.5 inches 14.5 inches 67 pounds
25 gallon 48 inches 15 inches 15 inches 15 inches 69 pounds
120 lb 48 inches 16 inches 16 inches 16 inches 75 pounds
30 gallon 48 inches 16.8 inches 16.8 inches 16.8 inches 81 pounds
150 lb 48 inches 18 inches 18 inches 18 inches 101 pounds
40 gallon 48 inches 19 inches 19 inches 19 inches 118 pounds
200 lb 48 inches 19.6 inches 19.6 inches 19.6 inches 127 pounds
50 gallon 50 inches 21 inches 21 inches 21 inches 139 pounds
60 gallon 50 inches 23.1 inches 23.1 inches 23.1 inches 156 pounds
80 gallon 50 inches 25.3 inches 25.3 inches 25.3 inches 178 pounds
420 lb 50 inches 27.9 inches 27.9 inches 27.9 inches 206 pounds
100 gallon 50 inches 28 inches 28 inches 28 inches 212 pounds
500 lb 52 inches 28.8 inches 28.8 inches 28.8 inches 254 pounds
120 gallon 52 inches 30 inches 30 inches 30 inches 260 pounds
150 gallon 85 inches 25 inches 25 inches 25 inches 298 pounds
200 gallon 88 inches 27 inches 27 inches 27 inches 387 pounds
250 gallon 92 inches 30 inches 30 inches 30 inches 483 pounds
300 gallon 100 inches 30 inches 30 inches 30 inches 591 pounds
400 gallon 112 inches 32 inches 32 inches 32 inches 794 pounds
500 gallon 120 inches 37 inches 37 inches 37 inches 949 pounds
750 gallon 160 inches 39 inches 39 inches 39 inches 1,365 pounds
1,000 gallon 190 inches 41 inches 41 inches 41 inches 1,760 pounds
2,000 gallon 288 inches 55 inches 55 inches 55 inches 3,400 pounds

Let’s now focus on key specifications of the 5 most common propane tank sizes. Let’s start with the 3 large residential propane tank sizes:

100 Gallon Propane Dimensions, Weight, BTUs

Dimensions (LxWxH): 50x28x28 Inches
Propane Content: 80 Gallons
Empty Tank Weight: 212 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 552 Pounds
How Many BTUs: 7,320,000 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 30 Days And 12 Hours

100 gallon is one of the most common horizontal residential propane tank sizes. It doesn’t necessarily be underground; most homeowners keep it in the basement or in the garage.

Dimensions of 100 gallon propane tank are 50-inch width (4 feet and 2 inches) and 28-inch diameter (that means 2 feet and 2 inches width and height).

You can fill a 100 gallon tank with a maximum of 80 gallons of propane. That’s the 80% rule; if it were filled to 100%, the tank would present a safety risk at high temperatures.

How much does a 100 gallon propane tank weigh when empty? 212 pounds, on average. Of course, it depends on the metal the tank is made out of; 100 gallon aluminum propane tanks are lighter than steel ones, for example.

How much does a 100 gallon propane tank weigh when full? 552 pounds, on average. Here you have to take the tare weight of the empty tank and add the weight of propane.

1 gallon of propane weighs 4.25 pounds. You can fill 80 gallons of propane in a 100-gallon tank, that’s an additional 80×4.25 = 340 pounds. Full 100 gallon tank weighs 212 lb + 340 lb = 552 lb.

Now for the BTU content calculation. Here is the simple conversion we can use:

1 gallon of propane = 91,500 BTU

How many BTUs are in a 100 gallon propane tank?

We need to multiply 80 gallon of propane with 91,500 BTU:

80 gallon × 91,500 BTU per gallon  = 7,320,000 BTU

There are 7,320,000 BTU in a 100 gallon propane tank. If we were to use this tank to produce 10,000 BTU/h of heating output, we could run such heating output for about 1 month (30 days and 12 hours, to be exact).

250 Gallon Propane Dimensions, Weight, BTUs

Dimensions (LxWxH): 92x30x30 Inches
Propane Content: 200 Gallons
Empty Tank Weight: 483 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 1,333 Pounds
How Many BTUs: 18,300,000 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 76 Days And 6 Hours

250 gallon propane tank is a semi-big size propane tank for home. It can hold 200 gallons of propane (80% safety rule). Let’s look at the dimensions:

250 gallon propane cylinder is 7 feet and 8 inches long (92 inches) and has a diameter of 30 inches (width and height are 2 feet and 6 inches). Its total weight when empty is 483 pounds, on average.

When you fill a 250 gallon with propane to the full, it weighs 1,333 pounds. The 200 gallon of propane adds 850 pounds of weight to the full weight of the 250 gallon propane tank.

How many BTUs are in 250 gallon propane tank?

18,300,000 BTUs in total. You can calculate the BTU content of 250 gallon tank by multiplying the max. volume of propane (200 gallon) with 91,500 BTU per gallon propane energy content.

With 18,300,000 BTU content, 250 gallon propane tank can run a 10,000 BTU/h heater or furnace for 76 days and 6 hours.

500 Gallon Propane Dimensions, Weight, BTUs

Dimensions (LxWxH): 120x37x37 Inches
Propane Content: 400 Gallons
Empty Tank Weight: 949 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 2,649 Pounds
How Many BTUs: 45,750,000 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 190 Days And 15 Hours

500 gallon is a large residential propane tank for homes. This big tank can be installed in the basement, in a large garage, or, in many cases, it can be an underground propane tank.

It holds a maximum of 400 gallon of propane. Empty 500 gallon propane tank weights about 949 pounds. If you add 400 gallon of propane (1,700 lb), the weight of a full 500 gallon propane tank is 2,649 pounds.

How many BTUs does a 500 gallon tank contain?

All in all, it contains almost 50 million BTUs (45,750,000 BTUs, to be exact). That’s enough to run a 10,000 BTU/h heater for more than half a year (190 days and 15 hours).

20 lb Propane Tank Dimension, Weight, BTUs

Dimensions (LxWxH): 8x4x4 Inches
Propane Content: 16 lb
Empty Tank Weight: 13.5 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 39.5 Pounds
20 lb Propane Tank BTU Content: 344,470 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 34.4 Hours

20 lb is the most common BBQ propane tank size. You can also use it to power propane a variety of propane heaters or even propane generators.

20 lb propane tank dimensions: It’s 8 inches long with a 4-inch diameter. Given the 80% safety rule, you can fill a total of 16 lb of propane in a 20 lb tank.

The weight of the empty 20 lb propane tank is about 13.5 pounds. Aluminum 20 lb propane cylinders can be lighter, steel ones will be heavier.

How much does a full 20 lb propane tank weigh?

The full 20 lb propane tank weighs 39.5 pounds, on average. You need to add the weight of 16 lb of propane to the empty weight (13.5 lbs) of the 20 lb propane tank to get the total.

All in all, a 20 lb propane tank packs quite a lot of BTUs. How many BTUs does it contain exactly?

20 lb propane tank contains 344,470 BTUs. That’s enough to power a 10,000 BTU/h heater for more than a day (34.4 hours, to be exact).

100 lb Propane Tank Dimension, Weight, BTUs

Dimensions (LxWxH): 48×14.5×14.5 Inches
Propane Content: 80 lb
Empty Tank Weight: 67 Pounds
Full Tank Weight: 147 Pounds
100 lb Propane Tank BTU Content: 1,722,350 BTUs
Can Generate 10,000 BTU/h For: 7 Days And 4 Hours

100 lb is a bigger vertical propane tank size. It’s a 4 feet long cylinder with a 14.5-inch diameter.

Empty 100 lb propane tank weighs 67 pounds. If you fill it up with 80 lb of propane, it will reach a full weight of 147 pounds.

That 80 lb of propane gives the 100 lb propane tank 1,722,350 BTU content. This is enough for a 100 lb propane tank to last for 7 days and 4 hours when powering a 10,000 BTU/h appliance.


We hope all of this information on propane tank sizes will help you. If you need additional help, you can pose a question in the comments below and we’re try our best to answer it.

.

Leave a Comment